Siem Reap
Cambodia
FRANCAIS | ENGLISH


Responsable: Eric Bourdonneau

EFEO Angkor

Eric Bourdonneau
Associate Professor at the French School of Asian Studies

Phum Boeng Daun Pa, Slorkram, Siem Reap
PO BOX 93300, Siem Reap, Cambodia
Tél & fax: (855) 63 964 226
Mobile : (+855) 17 934 300
eric.bourdonneau@efeo.net


PRESENTATION
LIBRARY
Eighth International Intensive Sanskrit Retreat
06 DECEMBER 12
 The “Eighth International Intensive Sanskrit Retreat”.   The “Eighth International Intensive Sanskrit Retreat” will be held this year (2013) in Siem Reap from 4th to 13th January.  The first event of this kind was conceived and organised principally by Imre Banga (Oxford) and by the Department of Indo-European Studies of Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, and was held in Miercurea Ciuk in Transylvania in 2002. The EFEO quickly became further involved and the second was held at the Pondicherry Centre of the EFEO in July 2004. (For more details, see: http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/befeo_0336-1519_2003_num_90_1_3626)   At each event a wide mix of students and confirmed researchers gathers from round the world to read a range of texts being edited by participants.  Editions of several works that were read in these meetings have since appeared. (In the realm of philosophy, for instance, parts of the Nyāyamañjarī have been published by Kei Kataoka; among tantric works, the Pañcāvaraṇastava has appeared in the Pondicherry series; and most recently, among belles lettres, an eighth-century novel about prostitutes, the Kuṭṭanīmata, has been edited and translated by Csaba Dezső and Dominic Goodall.)    At the first meetings, the texts chosen always belonged to one of three disciplines: poetry (kāvya), tantra and philosophy (śāstra).  This time the twenty-five participants will be reading principally Cambodian inscriptions in Sanskrit, particularly unpublished ones and ones whose editions require considerable revision.  A chapter of one work of poetry will be read that has exercised a powerful influence over royal inscriptions in Sanskrit everywhere, namely the Raghuvaṃśa of Kālidāsa, along with a draft edition of the oldest surviving Sanskrit commentary, that of Vallabhadeva.   As is usual on these occasions, readings will be interspersed with walking.
Photo : A reading session of the “Third International Intensive Sanskrit Summer Retreat” (organised by Monika Nowakowska of the University of Warsaw) in the Tatra Mountains of Southern Poland, July 2004.